What do muslims think of jesus

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what do muslims think of jesus

The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims by Mustafa Akyol

When Reza Aslan’s bestseller Zealot came out in 2013, there was criticism that he hadn’t addressed his Muslim faith while writing the origin story of Christianity. In fact, Ross Douthat of The New York Times wrote that “if Aslan had actually written in defense of the Islamic view of Jesus, that would have been something provocative and new.”

Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesus is that book.

The Islamic Jesus reveals startling new truths about Islam in the context of the first Muslims and the early origins of Christianity. Muslims and the first Christians—the Jewish followers of Jesus—saw Jesus as not divine but rather as a prophet and human Messiah and that salvation comes from faith and good works, not merely as faith, as Christians would later emphasize. What Akyol seeks to reveal are how these core beliefs of Jewish Christianity, which got lost in history as a heresy, emerged in a new religion born in 7th Arabia: Islam.

Akyol exposes this extraordinary historical connection between Judaism, Jewish Christianity and Islam—a major mystery unexplored by academia. From Jesus’ Jewish followers to the Nazarenes and Ebionites to the Qu’ran’s stories of Mary and Jesus, The Islamic Jesus will reveal links between religions that seem so contrary today. It will also call on Muslims to discover their own Jesus, at a time when they are troubled by their own Pharisees and Zealots.
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Muslims, Christians, and Jesus Group Bible Study by Carl Medearis

Muslims believe that Jesus was a prophet who was given a special message— injil, or the gospel—to convey to all people.
Mustafa Akyol

What do Muslims think of Jesus?

For centuries the people of the Arabian Peninsula have possessed a strong identity based upon the tenets of Islam. Saudi Arabia is a modern nation that adheres to Islam, honors its Arab heritage and tradition, and presses vigorously forward in the service of Islam while securing the welfare of its people. Islam, one of the world's great monotheistic religions, has Saudi Arabia as its heartland. Today, the worldwide community of Muslims, which embraces the people of many races and cultures, numbers well over one billion. Historically, Saudi Arabia has occupied a special place in the Islamic world, for it is towards Makkah and Islam's most sacred shrine, the Ka'abah, located in the Holy Mosque there, that Muslims throughout the world turn devoutly in prayer five times a day. An appreciation of Islamic history and culture is therefore essential for a genuine understanding of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, its Islamic heritage and its leading role in the Arab and Muslim worlds. The Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, enclosing the place from which the Prophet Muhammad ascended to heaven, completes the trio of venerated shrines in the Islamic world.

Islam is a monotheistic faith centered around belief in the one God Allah. In this regard, it shares some beliefs with Judaism and Christianity by tracing its history back to the patriarch Abraham, and ultimately to the first prophet, Adam. All the prophets preached the same universal message of belief in one God and kindness to humanity. The last in the series of prophets, according to Muslims, was Muhammad. He worked first as a shepherd and then as a merchant. He was not happy with the people around him because of superstitions and social and economic injustice. The people were worshipping many gods and had forgotten the message of prophet Abraham to worship one God.

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And as Pope Francis stated last week, we worship the same God. Her suspension is not about theology and orthodoxy. It is about enmity toward Muslims. I have even recommended that Christian women consider wearing the hijab in certain circumstances, as well as counseled Christian men to consider fasting with their Muslim neighbors during the month of Ramadan, as long as it is clear these gestures are out of Christian love and not submission to Islam. With this desire for love in mind, I turn now to the question: Do Muslims and Christians worship the same God?

This will be a very respectful presentation to anyone who wants to know about Jesus. No challenges. And there will be no criticism of any religion, in any way. Just as introduction, here are a few statements found in the Bible: "Until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen will by any means disappear, from the Law until everything has been accomplished. The Word of God will not disappear. Everything in it will be accomplished in its entirety till the very end. Again it states, "Heaven and earth will pass away but my words will never pass away.

In Islam, Jesus is believed to have been the precursor to Muhammad , attributing the name Ahmad to someone who would follow him. Islam rejects the divinity of Jesus and teaches that Jesus was not God incarnate , nor the Son of God , [a] and—according to some interpretations of the Quran—the crucifixion , death and resurrection is not believed to have occurred, and rather that God saved him. The account of Jesus begins with a prologue narrated several times in the Quran first describing the birth of his mother, Mary, and her service in the Jerusalem temple , while under the care of the prophet and priest Zechariah , who was to be the father of John the Baptist. The birth narrative in the Quran for Jesus begins at Maryam 19 and al-Imran 3 While Islamic theology affirms Mary as a pure vessel regarding the virgin birth of Jesus , it does not follow the concept of Immaculate Conception as related to Mary's birth in some Christian traditions. Islamic exegesis affirms the virginal birth of Jesus similarly to the Gospel account and occurring in Bethlehem.

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