Meet me in the bathroom pdf

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meet me in the bathroom pdf

Meet Me in the Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001-2011 by Lizzy Goodman

Joining the ranks of the classics Please Kill Me, Our Band Could Be Your Life, and Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, an intriguing oral history of the post-9/11 decline of the old-guard music industry and rebirth of the New York rock scene, led by a group of iconoclastic rock bands.

In the second half of the twentieth-century New York was the source of new sounds, including the Greenwich Village folk scene, punk and new wave, and hip-hop. But as the end of the millennium neared, cutting-edge bands began emerging from Seattle, Austin, and London, pushing New York further from the epicenter. The behemoth music industry, too, found itself in free fall, under siege from technology. Then 9/11/2001 plunged the country into a state of uncertainty and war—and a dozen New York City bands that had been honing their sound and style in relative obscurity suddenly became symbols of glamour for a young, web-savvy, forward-looking generation in need of an anthem.

Meet Me in the Bathroom charts the transformation of the New York music scene in the first decade of the 2000s, the bands behind it—including The Strokes, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem, Interpol, and Vampire Weekend—and the cultural forces that shaped it, from the Internet to a booming real estate market that forced artists out of the Lower East Side to Williamsburg. Drawing on 200 original interviews with James Murphy, Julian Casablancas, Karen O, Ezra Koenig, and many others musicians, artists, journalists, bloggers, photographers, managers, music executives, groupies, models, movie stars, and DJs who lived through this explosive time, journalist Lizzy Goodman offers a fascinating portrait of a time and a place that gave birth to a new era in modern rock-and-roll.
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Published 01.06.2019

Great Music, Bad Behavior: Inside "Meet Me in the Bathroom" and NYC's Last Rock Scene

Early-2000s NYC Rock History ‘Meet Me in the Bathroom’: 10 Things We Learned

Pitchfork: Considering it all took place so recently, when did you realize you needed to write this history? It's way too soon to do that. The idea began where the book ends. I went to see the then-final LCD Soundsystem show, which of course did not turn out to be the final show. It was a very dramatic culmination of their rise, and this reinvention of dance and rock music. Famous people are there, there are limos outside.

I n the opening two years of the 21st century, guitar-based rock enjoyed a late burst of creativity. The music industry was still thriving, yet to be laid waste by the internet. This is the backdrop of Meet Me in the Bathroom , an oral history by Lizzy Goodman, who arrived in New York from her native New Mexico in and was evidently immersed in everything that happened. The Strokes were a quintet of affluent young men who had met at exclusive schools, led by a singer whose father had founded the Elite model agency. On the face of it, they were gentrification incarnate.

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The whopping, near page account documents the unlikely takeover of bands like the Strokes and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs at a time when rap-rock and post-grunge were at their peak. Meet Me in the Bathroom touches on policy shifts within the city that resulted in rezoning and contributed to gentrification, the transition from old-school magazine criticism to the tastemaking blogosphere, the democratization of music discovery thanks to Napster and the doom that trend signaled for the industry at large. Few NYC gatherings of the era proved to be more influential than Shout! It was where you would go on Sunday nights to dance and drink and listen. The dance floor at Bar 13 became where I practiced this persona. The Strokes devised some aggressive self-promo tactics early on.

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