An old mans winter night

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an old mans winter night

Tom Dawe (Author of Spirited Away)

File Name: an old mans winter night.zip
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Published 21.05.2019

Neroche - Old Man Winter

Robert Frost: Poems Summary and Analysis of "An Old Man's Winter Night" (1916)

All out of doors looked darkly in at him Through the thin frost, almost in separate stars, That gathers on the pane in empty rooms. What kept his eyes from giving back the gaze Was the lamp tilted near them in his hand. What kept him from remembering what it was That brought him to that creaking room was age. He stood with barrels round him—at a loss. And having scared the cellar under him In clomping there, he scared it once again In clomping off;—and scared the outer night, Which has its sounds, familiar, like the roar Of trees and crack of branches, common things, But nothing so like beating on a box. A light he was to no one but himself Where now he sat, concerned with he knew what, A quiet light, and then not even that. He consigned to the moon,—such as she was, So late-arising,—to the broken moon As better than the sun in any case For such a charge, his snow upon the roof, His icicles along the wall to keep; And slept.

The omnipresence of hollow unisons and open fifths throughout reflect the poem's principle idea of isolation and loneliness, with more lush harmonies interspersed as the perseverence and hopefullness of the human spirit play out through the poem. The middle section, shown in italics, is not set vocally, but rather the gestures of reflections, clomping, the roaring of trees, and other suggested elements are alluded to musically. Suitable for the advanced community choir and above. All out of doors looked darkly in at him Through the thin frost, almost in separate stars, That gathers on the pane in empty rooms. What kept his eyes from giving back the gaze Was the lamp tilted near them in his hand. What kept him from remembering what it was That brought him to that creaking room was age. He stood with barrels round him - at a loss.

All out of doors looked darkly in at him Through the thin frost, almost in separate stars, That gathers on the pane in empty rooms. What kept his eyes from giving back the gaze Was the lamp tilted near them in his hand. What kept him from remembering what it was That brought him to that creaking room was age. He stood with barrels round him -- at a loss. And having scared the cellar under him In clomping there, he scared it once again In clomping off; -- and scared the outer night, Which has its sounds, familiar, like the roar Of trees and crack of branches, common things, But nothing so like beating on a box. A light he was to no one but himself Where now he sat, concerned with he knew what, A quiet light, and then not even that.

An old man stands alone in his house in the middle of winter. Because of his age, he does not remember why he is in the house or even his identity, but he maintains his presence against the grueling winter outside. At one point, he becomes frightened by the cellar beneath his feet and the dark night outside, and he stomps his feet loudly to frighten away the unknown.
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We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. There is no sense that the old man is existing for anyone or anything, he is purely alone. He is alone not only because no one is with him, but also because there will be no one to remember him after he dies. He develops a fear of the cellar beneath him and the darkness that lies outside so he strikes the ground in an attempt to frighten the unknown rather than confronting his fears. Finally, he falls asleep in front of the fire only to be disturbed by a log that has shifted in the fire but in due course, falls into a deep sleep. Frost uses the dying fire as a symbol to his fading life. As the night goes on, the fire dims and the old man grows closer to death.

1 COMMENTS

  1. Cloridan J. says:

    When did the last harry potter book come out paul bunyan and the grand canyon

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