Paul morley words and music

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paul morley words and music

Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City by Paul Morley

Has pop burnt itself out?Paul Morley takes the reader on an epic drive through the history of music to find out. A succession of celebrities, geniuses and other protagonists led by Madonna, Kraftwerk, Brian Eno, Erik Satie, John Cage and Wittgenstein appear to give their points of view. Detours and sights along the way include Missy Elliot, Jarvis Cocker, Eminem, Human League, Radiohead, Lou Reed, Now! Thats What I Call Music, Ornette Coleman and the ghost of Elvis Presley.
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Published 11.12.2018

Paul Morley in Conversation at London College of Communication

Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City

Che il ragazzo? Nulla di musicale, in ogni caso. Eppure, qualcosa rimane: l'immagine di quella giungla di citazioni, invenzioni, nodi e collegamenti. La "rete" di Mr. Morley, quella la si dimentica, ma ci si ritrova inevitabilmente catapultati nella propria.

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Qty : Please note there is a week delivery period for this title. Has pop burnt itself out? Inspired by the video for Kylie Minogue's hit single 'Can't Get You Out of My Head', acclaimed rock journalist Paul Morley is driving with Kylie towards a virtual city built of sound and ideas in search of the answer. Their journey bridges the various paradoxes of twentieth-century culture, as they encounter a succession of celebrities and geniuses - including Madonna, Kraftwerk, Wittgenstein and the ghost of Elvis Presley - and explore the iconic and the obscure, the mechanical and the digital, the avant-garde and the very nature of pop itself. You can unsubscribe from newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in any newsletter.

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Morley is a music journalist who wrote about pop and rock for New Musical Express in the s and 80s. He was also a member of the groundbreaking group, The Art Of Noise. After taking time off from writing about music after his NME days, Morley wrote a few books, including a memoir, and also this one. Words and Music is an epic account of music, meaning, and technology—particularly since the s, but also stretching back some four centuries. And the book is not just about popular music. Morley has an ear for the great classical stuff too.

Paul Morley. Paul Morley, acclaimed rock journalist and television arts pundit, has written the book he's always wanted to write - a complete history of pop music. With an incredibly imaginative twist. Inspired by the video for Kylie Minogue's hit single 'Can't Get You Out of My Head', Morley is driving with Kylie towards a virtual city built of sound and ideas in search of the answer to the question: has pop burnt itself out? Their ensuing journey bridges the various paradoxes of twentieth-century culture, as they meet a succession of celebrities and geniuses - including Madonna, Kraftwerk, Wittgenstein and the ghost of Elvis Presley - and explore the iconic and the obscure, the mechanical and the digital, the avant-garde, and pop itself.

After 20 pages, I was convinced that Words and Music was the best book about pop I had ever read. After pages, I was at least convinced that it was the weirdest book about pop I had ever read. But that too is a kind of recommendation. Most books about pop are simply products of glossy merchandising, or obsessive-compulsive histories of studio minutiae for prog rock or gangsta rap aficionados: they are essentially tribal credos, written by insiders for insiders, a sort of comfort reading whose sole purpose is to reassure the audience of the importance and heroism of their discrimination. The best book about pop that I had previously read was Ian MacDonald's Revolution in the Head, a masterpiece of musicological and sociological analysis concerning the songs and cultural context of the Beatles. Even so, MacDonald's writing is marred, in that book and elsewhere, by a kneejerk hatred of any music that is made using computers as tools. Such prejudice is still common among today's rock fans, who bleat that great pop can only be made by men with guitars and that "computer music" is by its nature soulless and inauthentic, even as they refuse to believe that their latest beloved fifth-generation Radiohead rip-off act has almost certainly had its "authentic" guitar 'n' drummery mercilessly converted into malleable computer bits and processed by studio boffins just as much as the latest slab of uplifting Eurotrance the DJs are caning right now in Ibiza.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Leverett L. says:

    A riotous book that does the good deed of dreaming up conversations between Ludwig Wittgenstein and Kylie Minogue, Words And Music listens past the surface of pop music to home in on the sound of human history.

  2. Laura R. says:

    Paul Morley: Words And Music: A History Of Pop In The Shape Of A City

  3. Jesse N. says:

    Notes On Paul Morley’s “Words and Music” – brettworks

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  5. Mohammed W. says:

    Review: Words and Music by Paul Morley | Books | The Guardian

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