Maurice bloch anthropology and the cognitive challenge

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maurice bloch anthropology and the cognitive challenge

Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge by Maurice Bloch

In this provocative new study one of the worlds most distinguished anthropologists proposes that an understanding of cognitive science enriches, rather than threatens, the work of social scientists. Maurice Bloch argues for a naturalist approach to social and cultural anthropology, introducing developments in cognitive sciences such as psychology and neurology and exploring the relevance of these developments for central anthropological concerns: the person or the self, cosmology, kinship, memory and globalisation. Opening with an exploration of the history of anthropology, Bloch shows why and how naturalist approaches were abandoned and argues that these once valid reasons are no longer relevant. Bloch then shows how such subjects as the self, memory and the conceptualisation of time benefit from being simultaneously approached with the tools of social and cognitive science. Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge will stimulate fresh debate among scholars and students across a wide range of disciplines.
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Ahona : Cognitive Anthropology

Cambridge Core - Social and Cultural Anthropology - Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge - by Maurice Bloch.
Maurice Bloch

Anthropology and the cognitive challenge

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His widowed mother remarried an Englishman, and moved with her son to England when he was eleven. He did all of his college and graduate work there, and has had most of his academic career at the London School of Economics , where he was made full professor in His grandmother was a niece of sociologist Emile Durkheim and a much younger first cousin of anthropologist Marcel Mauss. His father was killed by the Nazis while in the French Army. Kennedy , whom she had met at a conference. He continued his training in anthropology at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge , where he obtained his doctorate in His subsequent career has been almost entirely at the London School of Economics, where he was appointed a full professor in

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Maurice Bloch argues for a naturalist approach to social and cultural anthropology, introducing developments in cognitive sciences such as psychology and.
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Bloch, Maurice Anthropology and the cognitive challenge. New departures in anthropology.

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He has published widely on his research interests and his work has been translated into twelve languages. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge. Maurice Bloch. In this provocative new study one of the world's most distinguished anthropologists proposes that an understanding of cognitive science enriches, rather than threatens, the work of social scientists. Maurice Bloch argues for a naturalist approach to social and cultural anthropology, introducing developments in cognitive sciences such as psychology and neurology and exploring the relevance of these developments for central anthropological concerns: the person or the self, cosmology, kinship, memory and globalisation.

Bloch, Maurice. Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Bloch first discusses the rift between social and natural science and how it would benefit both groups to reconcile and understand each other. Interdisciplinary research and the benefits of cognitive scientists and anthropologists working together form the basis of the book, and Bloch returns to these points throughout. Bloch insists that the concerns of anthropologists and natural scientists about each other can be worked past. But beyond all of these arguments, Bloch insists, lies the fact that there is no legitimate reason to treat people differently just because genetic differences exist.

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