Shaw arms and the man

5.25  ·  8,817 ratings  ·  968 reviews
shaw arms and the man

Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw

Oh yes... & NOW the Nobel Prize seems more than adequate for Shaw.

It is awesome to see how Shaw has honed his skill considerably (both Widowers Houses and Mrs. Warrens Profession, written a few years before this one, are slightly more pedantic and the characters are less likeable, albeit, antiromantic/real). Arms and the Man is finally where we see the full roundedness of all the immoral characters--though this one finally has a man who is less interested in war than surviving it--who is dashing and brave... unconventional. There is a slight inclination for the romantic--the lovers quarrel and make love while the central issue is played out. Also--finally--comedy! Now we can understand why Shaw is Wildes earnest contemporary.

This mock epic (its title is derived from the opening in The Aenid) takes the reader from romance to realism, and somehow back again. It is complex--in both plot and character. The attack on idealism, which is what Shaw was truly all about, is ever present here. The story is colorful and very entertaining. This is obviously nearing Pygmalion territory...

A very good play.
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Published 07.12.2018

Arms the Man Summary, Characters Themes Video Lesson Transcript by alex

A short summary of George Bernard Shaw's Arms and the Man. This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of Arms and the Man.
George Bernard Shaw

ARMS AND THE MAN by G. B. Shaw

Act I. Act II. This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, The author died in , so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 60 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works. For works with similar titles, see Arms and the Man.

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ARMS AND THE MAN

Arms and the Man was one of Shaw's first commercial successes. He was called onto stage after the curtain, where he received enthusiastic applause. - To the irreverent—and which of us will claim entire exemption from that comfortable classification?

One of Shaw's aims in this play is to debunk the romantic heroics of war; he wanted to present a realistic account of war and to remove all pretensions of nobility from war. It is not, however, an anti-war play; instead, it is a satire on those attitudes which would glorify war. To create this satire, Shaw chose as his title the opening lines of Virgil's Aeneid, the Roman epic which glorifies war and the heroic feats of man in war, and which begins, "Of arms and the man I sing. When the play opens, we hear about the glorious exploits which were performed by Major Sergius Saranoff during his daring and magnificent cavalry raid, an event that turned the war against the Serbs toward victory for the Bulgarians. He thus becomes Raina Petkoff's ideal hero; yet the more that we learn about this raid, the more we realize that it was a futile, ridiculous gesture, one that bordered on an utter suicidal escapade. In contrast, Captain Bluntschli's actions in Raina's bedroom strike us, at first, as being the actions of a coward.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Devosamlie says:

    Arms and the Man is a comedy by George Bernard Shaw, whose title comes from the opening words of Virgil's Aeneid, in Latin: Arma virumque cano The play.

  2. Gaetane B. says:

    Arms and the Man is a play by George Bernard Shaw that was first performed in See a complete list of the characters in Arms and the Man and in-depth.

  3. Rebecca B. says:

    Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw

  4. Brie M. says:

    The play unfolds in Bulgaria in , towards the end of the Serbo-Bulgarian War.

  5. Anais C. says:

    Arms and the Man (Shaw) - Wikisource, the free online library

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