Mona baker translation and conflict

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mona baker translation and conflict

Translation and Conflict: A Narrative Account by Mona Baker

Translation and Conflict demonstrates that translators and interpreters participate in circulating as well as resisting the narratives that create the intellectual and moral environment for violent conflict. Drawing on narrative theory and using numerous examples from historical and contemporary conflicts, the author provides an original and coherent model of analysis that pays equal attention to micro and macro aspects of the circulation of narratives in translation, to translation and interpreting, and to questions of dominance and resistance.



The study is particularly significant at this juncture of history, with the increased interest in the positioning of translators in politically sensitive contexts, the growing concern with translators and interpreters divided loyalties in settings such as Guantanamo, Iraq, Kosovo, and other arenas of conflict, and the emergence of several activist communities of translators and interpreters with highly politicized agendas of their own, including Babels, Translators for Peace, Tlaxcala and ECOS.



Including further reading suggestions at the end of each chapter, Translation and Conflict will be of interest to students of translation, intercultural studies and sociology as well as the reader interested in the study of social and political movements.
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What is a narrative approach to translation? by Mona Baker

Translation and Conflict

Speaker: Prof. This lecture will draw on a study of the textual and non-textual behavior of volunteer subtitlers and filmmakers during a particularly tense and conflictual period in in Egypt. The period in question was characterized by extremely volatile and dangerous political developments that could not have been predicted at the start of the research project. The dangerous context and the challenges posed by a fast-paced, fluid, non-hierarchical pattern of collaboration between relatively distinct groups filmmakers and volunteer subtitlers who do not interact regularly despite producing prolific output collaboratively both impacted the research in distinct ways and called for an unusual degree of flexibility in dealing with events as they unfolded. These difficulties are further exasperated by the ethos of contemporary movements of collective action, where there is often no interest in maintaining a record of individual contributions to any output or even a basic hierarchical structure that prevents any member from editing a subtitled video after it has been published. She is founding Editor of The Translator St. Jerome Publishing, , former Editorial Director of St.

Main Research Area My main research interest at the moment is examining the role played by translators and interpreters in mediating conflict. The underlying assumption of my work is that whoever undertakes it, and whatever form it takes, translation is never a by-product of social and political developments. It is part and parcel of the very process that makes these developments possible in the first place. Translation is also not innocent. It is not about "building bridges" or "enabling communication" as is commonly assumed, but about the active circulation and promotion of narratives. Morally speaking, it is neither inherently good nor inherently bad in itself - it depends on the nature of the narratives it promotes and in which it is embedded, and of course on the narrative location of the person assessing it. In all types of conflict, but particularly in an international conflict such as the war on Iraq and the so-called war on terror, translation is central to the ability of all parties to legitimize their version of events, their narratives.

Translation and conflict: A narrative account : A Narrative Account. N2 - Translation and Conflict demonstrates that translators and interpreters participate in circulating as well as resisting the narratives that create the intellectual and moral environment for violent conflict. Drawing on narrative theory and using numerous examples from historical and contemporary conflicts, the author provides an original and coherent model of analysis that pays equal attention to micro and macro aspects of the circulation of narratives in translation, to translation and interpreting, and to questions of dominance and resistance. The study is particularly significant at this juncture of history, with the increased interest in the positioning of translators in politically sensitive contexts, the growing concern with translators' and interpreters' divided loyalties in settings such as Guantanamo, Iraq, Kosovo, and other arenas of conflict, and the emergence of several activist communities of translators and interpreters with highly politicized agendas of their own, including Babels, Translators for Peace, Tlaxcala and ECOS. Including further reading suggestions at the end of each chapter, Translation and Conflict will be of interest to students of translation, intercultural studies and sociology as well as the reader interested in the study of social and political movements.

Provides an exploration of the importance of the role of translators and interpreters to the political process. This book shows how the narrative location of the source text is maintained, undermined or adapted. It is useful for students on courses in translation, intercultural studies and sociology.
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Full-text and supplementary files are not available from Manchester eScholar. Full-text is available externally using the following links:. Translation and Conflict: A Narrative Account demonstrates that translation is part of the institution of war and that translators and interpreters participate in circulating as well as resisting the narratives that create the intellectual and moral environment for violent conflict. Drawing on narrative theory and using numerous examples from historical as well as and contemporary conflicts, it provides an original and coherent model of analysis that pays equal attention to micro and macro aspects of the circulation of narratives in translation, to translation and interpreting, and to questions of dominance and resistance. The study is particularly significant at this juncture of history, with the increased interest in the positioning of translators in politically sensitive contexts, the growing concern with translators' and interpreters' divided loyalties in settings such as Guantanamo Bay, Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, and a host of other arenas of conflict, and the emergence of several activist communities of translators and interpreters with highly politicized agendas of their own, including Babels, Translators for Peace, Tlaxcala and ECOS and Translators and Interpreters Peace Network. Including further reading suggestions at the end of each chapter, Translation and Conflict is relevant to students on courses of translation, intercultural studies and sociology as well as the reader interested in the study of social and political movements.

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