Which statement about medieval cities is true

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which statement about medieval cities is true

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Secrets of the Castle: Why Build A Castle? - Episode 1 - (Medieval Documentary) - Timeline

Medieval university

In the history of Europe , the Middle Ages or medieval period lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. The Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity , the medieval period, and the modern period. Population decline , counterurbanisation , collapse of centralized authority, invasions, and mass migrations of tribes , which had begun in Late Antiquity , continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period , including various Germanic peoples , formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire. In the 7th century, North Africa and the Middle East—once part of the Byzantine Empire —came under the rule of the Umayyad Caliphate , an Islamic empire, after conquest by Muhammad's successors.

Using Kickstarter data to identify the US’ creative communities

Middle Ages , the period in European history from the collapse of Roman civilization in the 5th century ce to the period of the Renaissance variously interpreted as beginning in the 13th, 14th, or 15th century, depending on the region of Europe and other factors., But how much do you really know about the Middle Ages? Here, John H Arnold, professor of medieval history at Birkbeck, University of London, reveals 10 things about the period that might surprise you.

A medieval university is a corporation organized during the Middle Ages for the purposes of higher education. The first Western European institutions generally considered universities were established in the Kingdom of Italy then part of the Holy Roman Empire , the Kingdom of England , the Kingdom of France , the Kingdom of Spain , and the Kingdom of Portugal between the 11th and 15th centuries for the study of the Arts and the higher disciplines of Theology , Law , and Medicine. The word universitas originally applied only to the scholastic guilds —that is, the corporation of students and masters—within the studium , and it was always modified, as universitas magistrorum , universitas scholarium , or universitas magistrorum et scholarium. Eventually, however, probably in the late 14th century, the term began to appear by itself to exclusively mean a self-regulating community of teachers and scholars recognized and sanctioned by civil or ecclesiastical authority. From the early modern period onward, this Western -style organizational form gradually spread from the medieval Latin west across the globe, eventually replacing all other higher-learning institutions and becoming the preeminent model for higher education everywhere.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Susan A. says:

    Life in the Middle Ages: 10 Surprising Facts - HistoryExtra

  2. Eligio O. says:

    Today, Tokyo is the most populous city in the world; through most of the 20th century it was New York.

  3. Abbie C. says:

    Population-Area Relationship for Medieval European Cities

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