What does the talmud say about jesus

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what does the talmud say about jesus

Jesus in the Talmud by Peter Schafer

Scattered throughout the Talmud, the founding document of rabbinic Judaism in late antiquity, can be found quite a few references to Jesus--and theyre not flattering. In this lucid, richly detailed, and accessible book, Peter Sch?fer examines how the rabbis of the Talmud read, understood, and used the New Testament Jesus narrative to assert, ultimately, Judaisms superiority over Christianity.


The Talmudic stories make fun of Jesus birth from a virgin, fervently contest his claim to be the Messiah and Son of God, and maintain that he was rightfully executed as a blasphemer and idolater. They subvert the Christian idea of Jesus resurrection and insist he got the punishment he deserved in hell--and that a similar fate awaits his followers.


Sch?fer contends that these stories betray a remarkable familiarity with the Gospels--especially Matthew and John--and represent a deliberate and sophisticated anti-Christian polemic that parodies the New Testament narratives. He carefully distinguishes between Babylonian and Palestinian sources, arguing that the rabbis proud and self-confident countermessage to that of the evangelists was possible only in the unique historical setting of Persian Babylonia, in a Jewish community that lived in relative freedom. The same could not be said of Roman and Byzantine Palestine, where the Christians aggressively consolidated their political power and the Jews therefore suffered.


A departure from past scholarship, which has played down the stories as unreliable distortions of the historical Jesus, Jesus in the Talmud posits a much more deliberate agenda behind these narratives.
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Published 24.11.2018

Rabbi Jonathan Romain vs Michael Brown • Was Jesus the Jewish Messiah?

The Jewish Talmud and the Death of Christ

Jesus is the central figure of Christianity, believed by Christians to be the messiah, the son of God and the second person in the Trinity. While there is no archaeological or other physical evidence for his existence, most scholars agree that Jesus did exist and that he was born sometime in the decade before the Common Era and crucified sometime between CE the years when the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, ruled Judea. He lived at a time when the Roman Empire ruled what is now Israel and sectarianism was rife, with major tensions among Jews not only over how much to cooperate with the Romans but also how to interpret Torah. It was also, for some, a restive time when displeasure with Roman policies, as well as with the Temple high priests, bred hopes for a messianic redeemer who would throw off the foreign occupiers and restore Jewish sovereignty in the Land of Israel. By the first century, the view developed that the messianic age would witness a general resurrection of the dead, the in-gathering of all the Jews, including the 10 lost tribes , to the land of Israel, a final judgment and universal peace. The Dead Sea Scrolls speak of two messiahs: one a military leader and the other a priest. Still other Jews expected the prophet Elijah, or the angel Michael, or Enoch, or any number of other figures to usher in the messianic age.

Rabbi Eliezer remarked that the one in his bare head was illegitimate, a mamzer. Rabbi Jehoschua said that he was conceived during menstruation, ben niddah. Rabbi Akibah, however, said that he was both. Whereupon the others asked Rabbi Akibah why he dared to contradict his colleagues. He answered that he could prove what he said. He went therefore to the boy's mother whom he saw sitting in the market place selling vegetables and said to her: 'My daughter, if you will answer truthfully what I am going to ask you, I promise that you will be saved in the next life.

Scattered throughout the Talmud, the founding document of rabbinic Judaism in late antiquity, can be found quite a few references to Jesus--and they're not flattering. The Talmudic stories make fun of Jesus' birth from a virgin, fervently contest his claim to be the Messiah and Son of God, and maintain that he was rightfully executed as a blasphemer and idolater. They subvert the Christian idea of Jesus' resurrection and insist he got the punishment he deserved in hell--and that a similar fate awaits his followers. He carefully distinguishes between Babylonian and Palestinian sources, arguing that the rabbis' proud and self-confident countermessage to that of the evangelists was possible only in the unique historical setting of Persian Babylonia, in a Jewish community that lived in relative freedom. The same could not be said of Roman and Byzantine Palestine, where the Christians aggressively consolidated their political power and the Jews therefore suffered. A departure from past scholarship, which has played down the stories as unreliable distortions of the historical Jesus, Jesus in the Talmud posits a much more deliberate agenda behind these narratives.

Written by Gil Student, this article discusses the topic of Jesus in the Talmud. The Accusation Insults Against Blessed Mary, Sanhedrin a, says Jesus' This passage has absolutely nothing to do with Jesus and there is certainly no insult.
glenn beck the original argument

The Talmud and the Gospels

Or, as Chrysostom c. An evil contingent within the Jewish nation influenced the Romans to put Christ to death. No serious student of history can deny this reality. For nearly two millennia Jewish writers have been attempting to revise history in an effort to rationalize their role in the death of Jesus of Nazareth. In each attempt, they pitifully ensnare themselves. Better it would have been had they treated the awful history factually and simply moved on. In this brief article we take note of a passage in the Jewish Talmud that speaks of the death of Jesus.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Mabel A. says:

    This is claimed to be a reference to Jesus.

  2. Brandy P. says:

    The Talmud teaches that Jesus Christ was illegitimate and was conceived during But if he says 'This is our duty and it is right for us to do so,' then the.

  3. David C. says:

    Where in the bible is the story of zacharias speakers guidebook text and reference

  4. Monika S. says:

    There are several passages in the Talmud which are believed by some scholars to be . and "Are we not right in saying that you are a Samaritan and have a demon?" and in return in the . Ulla said: "Do you suppose that Jesus the Nazarene was one for whom a defense could be made? He was a mesit ( someone who.

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