Interesting facts about aprille ericsson

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interesting facts about aprille ericsson

Space Engineer and Scientist Margaret Hamilton by Domenica Di Piazza

Have you ever watched video of astronauts walking on the moon? Margaret Hamilton programmed software that helped get them there. As a girl, Hamilton loved math and science. She grew up during a time when very few women studied computer science, but Hamilton knew she wanted to write code. As an adult, she worked on NASAs Apollo program, creating computer programs to guide spacecraft to and from the moon. This included the 1969 Apollo 11 mission--the first spaceflight that landed humans on the moon. In 2016, Hamilton was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work. Learn how Hamiltons passion for math and computers played a key role in space exploration.
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Hidden Figures: Marie Maynard Daly #BlackHERstoryMonth 27/28

GeekGirlCon Blog

Aprille Ericsson-Jackson born April 1, [1] is an American aerospace engineer. She was a bright and gifted child. She said she first realized she had an aptitude for mathematics and science during junior high where she was the only black student enrolled in the Special Progress Program. But instead of attending those schools, she moved to live with her grandparents in Cambridge, MA, where she attended Cambridge School of Weston. In and Ericsson-Jackson was named one of the top fifty minority women working in the Science and Engineering fields by the National Technical Association.

Her parents separated when Ericsson-Jackson was just eight years old. Ericsson-Jackson was the product of a public education, bussing to PS in Brooklyn. She was a Girl Scout, travelled to camp every summer, was an accomplished athlete — excelling at basketball, and was a member of the marching band. Here she continued to balance intense studies with music and athletics and was even a volunteer Physical Education teacher for local public elementary schools. It was on a school summer program during her junior year of high school, a program held at MIT that changed her life.

Prepare to be inspired.

In and Ericsson-Jackson was named one of the top fifty minority women working in the Science and Engineering fields by the National Technical Association. Ericsson-Jackson was born in Brooklyn , New York , the oldest of four daughters. Raised in the Bedford Styve-sant neighborhood in the Roosevelt projects on Dekalb Avenue, she started out her educational career being bussed to the P.

She was a bright and gifted child. She attended P. She said she first realized she had an aptitude for mathematics and science during junior high where she was the only black student enrolled in the Special Progress Program. But instead of attending those schools, she moved to live with her grandparents in Cambridge, MA , where she attended Cambridge School of Weston. In high school, she played basketball and softball and excelled in sports, math and science.

Not only did this profound trio cross gender and race lines in the late s and early s, but they set the stage for other African-American women to excel in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. Although there's still a long way to go — as the diversity of the STEM workforce has remained the same since — according to data from Change the Equation , Black women have been making strides in the field. And not only in real life. Another Marvel Universe creation is a sweet little Black girl: 9-year-old super genius and skillful engineer Luella Lafayette, who was hailed as the smartest hero at 's San Diego Comic-Con. Now, let's lift the veil on some other extraordinary real-life hidden figures — Black women in the STEM field that you may or may not know.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Capucine B. says:

    Aprille Ericsson by Natalie Barnard on Prezi

  2. Raymond P. says:

    Aprille Ericsson-Jackson

  3. Rocio G. says:

    In and Ericsson-Jackson was named one of the top fifty minority women working in the Science and Engineering fields by the National Technical Association.

  4. Peter D. says:

    Black History Month Inspiration: Dr. Aprille Ericsson-Jackson, Engineer, Pioneer

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